Intimate Portrait Of An Object

As visual artists, we see and appreciate ordinary objects around us as if they were treasures. One of the biggest challenges new photographers face is to learn to make a stronger image while removing distracting elements from the frame. While it comes very naturally to some, others struggle to see photographically for years. During my workshops I urge my students to work with a fixed focal length lens and to crop in camera as much as possible. The cropping tool in your processing software is an amazing resource, but should be used ‘responsibly’ to tweak or straighten but not as a composition tool.

Composition is something you need to feel, not think about. Practice, practice, practice! Ultimately, your goal is to be able to make a successful image in one shot and spend less and less time working your composition. You need to be able to make all the decisions to tell your story before you press the shutter. Any ordinary object around you can look extraordinary, it’s your challenge to reveal it’s beauty through your lens… The best part is that you can practice anywhere, anytime!

 

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

8 thoughts on “Intimate Portrait Of An Object

  1. Excellent set and very sage advice. I am obsessed with making shots as straight as possible, but often struggle to do that in the viewfinder. The straighten tool in the edit can save me from going a shade of mad!

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  2. I’ll admit that I crop my butterfly photography when I am unable to get as close as I’d like. It isn’t really a crutch so much as a necessary evil. However, for any other kind of photography I tend to avoid cropping like the plague. If the image doesn’t communicate anything as it is, no amount of cropping will save it.

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  3. Valerie, your posts are always so inspiring and insightful, and the images are always tremendous.

    Cropping in-camera is something I always try to do. I think the only time I actually do any sort of cropping is if I feel the need to straighten an image in post processing.

    The patience and attention to detail you must pay in order to crop correctly in-camera, for me at least, is part of the fun and challenge of photography.

    Great post!

    Like

    • Thank you Shane! True, I see so many photographers using the cropping in post processing as a composition tool. It becomes a crutch and prevents them from developing their creative vision in the field.

      Like

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