The Lost Generation

What do I do when I have a few hours off during a photo workshop? I still hang out with photographers! That’s exactly what I was doing yesterday morning after enjoying a café au lait with a friend at Place de La Contrescarpe on the first beautiful day of October. A few minutes later, serendipidy opened the door into Hemingway’s world. I walk by the famous writer’s apartment every day, often a few times a day. The door was open and, as photographers, we just can’t resist such an opportunity. We were invited into the building where Hemingway and Hadley lived when they first arrived in Paris in 1922. It is in this very building that the author discovered the style that characterizes him.

We grabbed a few hand held shots at high ISO, often as high as 6400. The pics didn’t really matter, it was all about the memorable experience of being there. I will never forget it!

Here are a few pics, I hope you enjoy them…

 

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Valérie Jardin

©Klaas van Huizen

©Klaas van Huizen

Had I known I was going to be photographed on the steps where Hemingway walked everyday for a year, I would have dressed up 😉

17 thoughts on “The Lost Generation

  1. I love the variety of angles you captured. I think I too often get caught up in showing the whole picture that I forget the importance of the details. This series reminded me to look in different ways. Thanks!

    Like

  2. I love your photos of the staircase! It proves, again, that composition is everything! What do you do with pics taken at ISO of 6400? It doesn’t matter if you just post them on the internet. But, do you print them if you like the image? Do you feel there’s a size limit on printing with ISO this high? Or, can you scrub out the noise enough in post-processing that it doesn’t matter? Thanks.

    Like

    • Thanks! I never worry about ISO when I’m not on a commercial shoot. I didn’t de-noise any of these. In my opinion, if the noise bothers anyone, then the picture was not good enough in the first place. It’s about content, no one cares about the grain in the old photographs that have become so iconic. I also think that many photographers as too hung up on the technical perfection and often lack the story telling abilities. I hope this helps answer your question 🙂

      Like

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